Which Insects Are Good For Gardens?

Which Insects Are Good For Gardens?

Insects can creep a lot of people out, and they have a bad rep when it comes to gardening and farming. Many gardeners may find any insect in their garden to be a threat to the well being of the plants being grown. But actually, most bugs on this planet will not harm your plants. Some researchers have estimated that ten percent of all insects are either helpful or damaging to crops and gardens. The problem is that many gardeners cannot tell the difference between beneficial insects and insect-pests. However, determining which bugs are either harmful or beneficial to a garden is often enough rather simple, provided you are willing to look at them.

Some bugs that are beneficial to gardens look similar to bugs that are damaging to gardens. Rove beetles and earwigs are two insects that happen to look very much alike, but only one of these insects is damaging to gardens. Rove beetles are always on the lookout for moist environments, such as a regularly watered garden. Rove beetles are quite beneficial to have around even if you don’t indulge in any gardening. This is because rove beetles consume a number of different insect-pests such as aphids, mites, flies, mosquitoes, fleas, and fly-maggots, which infest carrion. Earwigs, on the other hand, are similar looking insect pests, but they can be easily differentiated from rove beetles in that earwigs have forcep-like pincers protruding from their abdomens.

Another beneficial insect that is commonly found crawling within gardens is the spined soldier bug. This type of stinkbug is the most common predatory stinkbug in the United States. This stinkbug is often confused with a different stinkbug from the species Euchistus. The Euchistus species of stinkbug loves to devour plants, but they can be discerned from soldier bugs by the spiny protrusions on their bodies. The spined soldier bug is a bug that garden owners will want to see in their gardens. This is because spined soldier bugs consume grubs, gypsy moth larvae, and many more problematic insect pests. So before you break out the bug spray, be sure to take a second look at the creepy-crawlies inhabiting your garden.

Have you ever taken the time to examine an insect that you found so that you could learn more about the insect?